Mapbox Map of 4.9,52.349998

YWAM LOS ANGELES

YOUTH WITH A MISSION

11141 Osborne Street
Lake View Terrace
CA
91342
United States of America

Visit WebsiteEmail Base

SCHOOLS RUN AT THIS LOCATION

Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation Module I ( APL 531 )

This course is the first module of Mali BT. Mali BT has six modules of roughly 14 weeks each, spread throughout two years. The modules combine periods of intensive study, with periods of semi-intensive work, when students work on their assignments 2-3 hours per day. Each module has its own internal structure, and students are expected to complete between 6 and 9 credits per module. In the last module students are expected to work in teams to complete the translation of the book of Ruth into a language, or to write a thesis on Oral Bible Translation. The word MALI stands for Master in Applied Linguistics, but MALI is also a Polynesian word that refers to the art of skillfully and carefully weaving together different materials in order to create a well-finished and beautiful piece of art craft. The term is also used to refer to the art of carefully weaving words to comfort, to bring wisdom, or to soothe one's pain. It talks about the ability to craft nicely a discourse or a story. Wise people know how to MALI or weave the words carefully. The Master in Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation prepares students to perform specialist roles in Bible translation service among minority language groups. Our graduates will have the tools to work as facilitators in mother-tongue Bible translation projects as well as consultation practitioners for both written and oral Bible translation. "Today, there are between 165 and 180 million people with no portion of the Word of God available in their mother tongue… The Lord is pressing us into action. He has given us talented people and anointed partnerships. He has led men and women to create amazing technological tools. But we need to give Him our own loaves and fishes before He can multiply them." Loren Cunningham The UofN Master in Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation program has been specifically designed to equip YWAMers to make their contribution to Bible translation service as facilitators, translators, and mentors and potentially serve in the consultancy process. We are inspired by some YWAMers who are already involved in Bible translation for decades, and we want to see their example multiplied by hundreds in our mission. Our Master program is our response to the "End Bible Poverty Now" call, and more specifically to the “Pacific Wa’a Covenant” signed by leaders of several missionary organizations in the Pacific region. In this context, YWAM has a role in multiplying the next generation of Bible translation practitioners, who will contribute to eradicating Bible poverty in the world. The embryo concept of the present program was conceived in 2015 after a three-day meeting in Kona between Bryan Harmelink, Marcia Suzuki, and Edson Suzuki. Dr. Harmelink, the Global Consultant for Bible Translation & Collaboration of Wycliffe Bible Alliance, realized that YWAM was ready and was a fertile ground to innovate the approach to Bible translation training in general. After that meeting, the embryo concept was further developed and refined through a creative process of discussion,  reflection, and prayer involving the Suzukis, David Hamilton, and Youngshin Kim.

Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation Module II ( APL 532 )

This course is the second module of Mali BT. Mali BT has six modules of roughly 14 weeks each, spread throughout two years. The modules combine periods of intensive study, with periods of semi-intensive work, when students work on their assignments 2-3 hours per day. Each module has its own internal structure, and students are expected to complete between 6 and 9 credits per module. In the last module students are expected to work in teams to complete the translation of the book of Ruth into a language, or to write a thesis on Oral Bible Translation. The word MALI stands for Master in Applied Linguistics, but MALI is also a Polynesian word that refers to the art of skillfully and carefully weaving together different materials in order to create a well-finished and beautiful piece of art craft. The term is also used to refer to the art of carefully weaving words to comfort, to bring wisdom, or to soothe one's pain. It talks about the ability to craft nicely a discourse or a story. Wise people know how to MALI or weave the words carefully. The Master in Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation prepares students to perform specialist roles in Bible translation service among minority language groups. Our graduates will have the tools to work as facilitators in mother-tongue Bible translation projects as well as consultation practitioners for both written and oral Bible translation. "Today, there are between 165 and 180 million people with no portion of the Word of God available in their mother tongue… The Lord is pressing us into action. He has given us talented people and anointed partnerships. He has led men and women to create amazing technological tools. But we need to give Him our own loaves and fishes before He can multiply them." Loren Cunningham The UofN Master in Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation program has been specifically designed to equip YWAMers to make their contribution to Bible translation service as facilitators, translators, and mentors and potentially serve in the consultancy process. We are inspired by some YWAMers who are already involved in Bible translation for decades, and we want to see their example multiplied by hundreds in our mission. Our Master program is our response to the "End Bible Poverty Now" call, and more specifically to the “Pacific Wa’a Covenant” signed by leaders of several missionary organizations in the Pacific region. In this context, YWAM has a role in multiplying the next generation of Bible translation practitioners, who will contribute to eradicating Bible poverty in the world. The embryo concept of the present program was conceived in 2015 after a three-day meeting in Kona between Bryan Harmelink, Marcia Suzuki, and Edson Suzuki. Dr. Harmelink, the Global Consultant for Bible Translation & Collaboration of Wycliffe Bible Alliance, realized that YWAM was ready and was a fertile ground to innovate the approach to Bible translation training in general. After that meeting, the embryo concept was further developed and refined through a creative process of discussion,  reflection, and prayer involving the Suzukis, David Hamilton, and Youngshin Kim.

Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation Module III ( APL 533 )

This course is the third module of Mali BT. Mali BT has six modules of roughly 14 weeks each, spread throughout two years. The modules combine periods of intensive study, with periods of semi-intensive work, when students work on their assignments 2-3 hours per day. Each module has its own internal structure, and students are expected to complete between 6 and 9 credits per module. In the last module students are expected to work in teams to complete the translation of the book of Ruth into a language, or to write a thesis on Oral Bible Translation. The word MALI stands for Master in Applied Linguistics, but MALI is also a Polynesian word that refers to the art of skillfully and carefully weaving together different materials in order to create a well-finished and beautiful piece of art craft. The term is also used to refer to the art of carefully weaving words to comfort, to bring wisdom, or to soothe one's pain. It talks about the ability to craft nicely a discourse or a story. Wise people know how to MALI or weave the words carefully. The Master in Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation prepares students to perform specialist roles in Bible translation service among minority language groups. Our graduates will have the tools to work as facilitators in mother-tongue Bible translation projects as well as consultation practitioners for both written and oral Bible translation. "Today, there are between 165 and 180 million people with no portion of the Word of God available in their mother tongue… The Lord is pressing us into action. He has given us talented people and anointed partnerships. He has led men and women to create amazing technological tools. But we need to give Him our own loaves and fishes before He can multiply them." Loren Cunningham The UofN Master in Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation program has been specifically designed to equip YWAMers to make their contribution to Bible translation service as facilitators, translators, and mentors and potentially serve in the consultancy process. We are inspired by some YWAMers who are already involved in Bible translation for decades, and we want to see their example multiplied by hundreds in our mission. Our Master program is our response to the "End Bible Poverty Now" call, and more specifically to the “Pacific Wa’a Covenant” signed by leaders of several missionary organizations in the Pacific region. In this context, YWAM has a role in multiplying the next generation of Bible translation practitioners, who will contribute to eradicating Bible poverty in the world. The embryo concept of the present program was conceived in 2015 after a three-day meeting in Kona between Bryan Harmelink, Marcia Suzuki, and Edson Suzuki. Dr. Harmelink, the Global Consultant for Bible Translation & Collaboration of Wycliffe Bible Alliance, realized that YWAM was ready and was a fertile ground to innovate the approach to Bible translation training in general. After that meeting, the embryo concept was further developed and refined through a creative process of discussion,  reflection, and prayer involving the Suzukis, David Hamilton, and Youngshin Kim.

Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation Module IV ( APL 534 )

This course is the fourth module of Mali BT. Mali BT has six modules of roughly 14 weeks each, spread throughout two years. The modules combine periods of intensive study, with periods of semi-intensive work, when students work on their assignments 2-3 hours per day. Each module has its own internal structure, and students are expected to complete between 6 and 9 credits per module. In the last module students are expected to work in teams to complete the translation of the book of Ruth into a language, or to write a thesis on Oral Bible Translation. The word MALI stands for Master in Applied Linguistics, but MALI is also a Polynesian word that refers to the art of skillfully and carefully weaving together different materials in order to create a well-finished and beautiful piece of art craft. The term is also used to refer to the art of carefully weaving words to comfort, to bring wisdom, or to soothe one's pain. It talks about the ability to craft nicely a discourse or a story. Wise people know how to MALI or weave the words carefully. The Master in Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation prepares students to perform specialist roles in Bible translation service among minority language groups. Our graduates will have the tools to work as facilitators in mother-tongue Bible translation projects as well as consultation practitioners for both written and oral Bible translation. "Today, there are between 165 and 180 million people with no portion of the Word of God available in their mother tongue… The Lord is pressing us into action. He has given us talented people and anointed partnerships. He has led men and women to create amazing technological tools. But we need to give Him our own loaves and fishes before He can multiply them." Loren Cunningham The UofN Master in Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation program has been specifically designed to equip YWAMers to make their contribution to Bible translation service as facilitators, translators, and mentors and potentially serve in the consultancy process. We are inspired by some YWAMers who are already involved in Bible translation for decades, and we want to see their example multiplied by hundreds in our mission. Our Master program is our response to the "End Bible Poverty Now" call, and more specifically to the “Pacific Wa’a Covenant” signed by leaders of several missionary organizations in the Pacific region. In this context, YWAM has a role in multiplying the next generation of Bible translation practitioners, who will contribute to eradicating Bible poverty in the world. The embryo concept of the present program was conceived in 2015 after a three-day meeting in Kona between Bryan Harmelink, Marcia Suzuki, and Edson Suzuki. Dr. Harmelink, the Global Consultant for Bible Translation & Collaboration of Wycliffe Bible Alliance, realized that YWAM was ready and was a fertile ground to innovate the approach to Bible translation training in general. After that meeting, the embryo concept was further developed and refined through a creative process of discussion, reflection, and prayer involving the Suzukis, David Hamilton, and Youngshin Kim.

Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation Module V ( APL 535 )

This course is the fifth module of Mali BT. Mali BT has six modules of roughly 14 weeks each, spread throughout two years. The modules combine periods of intensive study, with periods of semi-intensive work, when students work on their assignments 2-3 hours per day. Each module has its own internal structure, and students are expected to complete between 6 and 9 credits per module. In the last module students are expected to work in teams to complete the translation of the book of Ruth into a language, or to write a thesis on Oral Bible Translation. The word MALI stands for Master in Applied Linguistics, but MALI is also a Polynesian word that refers to the art of skillfully and carefully weaving together different materials in order to create a well-finished and beautiful piece of art craft. The term is also used to refer to the art of carefully weaving words to comfort, to bring wisdom, or to soothe one's pain. It talks about the ability to craft nicely a discourse or a story. Wise people know how to MALI or weave the words carefully. The Master in Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation prepares students to perform specialist roles in Bible translation service among minority language groups. Our graduates will have the tools to work as facilitators in mother-tongue Bible translation projects as well as consultation practitioners for both written and oral Bible translation. "Today, there are between 165 and 180 million people with no portion of the Word of God available in their mother tongue… The Lord is pressing us into action. He has given us talented people and anointed partnerships. He has led men and women to create amazing technological tools. But we need to give Him our own loaves and fishes before He can multiply them." Loren Cunningham The UofN Master in Applied Linguistics for Bible Translation program has been specifically designed to equip YWAMers to make their contribution to Bible translation service as facilitators, translators, and mentors and potentially serve in the consultancy process. We are inspired by some YWAMers who are already involved in Bible translation for decades, and we want to see their example multiplied by hundreds in our mission. Our Master program is our response to the "End Bible Poverty Now" call, and more specifically to the “Pacific Wa’a Covenant” signed by leaders of several missionary organizations in the Pacific region. In this context, YWAM has a role in multiplying the next generation of Bible translation practitioners, who will contribute to eradicating Bible poverty in the world. The embryo concept of the present program was conceived in 2015 after a three-day meeting in Kona between Bryan Harmelink, Marcia Suzuki, and Edson Suzuki. Dr. Harmelink, the Global Consultant for Bible Translation & Collaboration of Wycliffe Bible Alliance, realized that YWAM was ready and was a fertile ground to innovate the approach to Bible translation training in general. After that meeting, the embryo concept was further developed and refined through a creative process of discussion, reflection, and prayer involving the Suzukis, David Hamilton, and Youngshin Kim.

Discipleship Bible School ( CHR 205 )

In this course students are equipped with tools for continual development of personal Bible study. This course combines dynamic teaching, small group processing, personal study, one on one-s and practical application in order to help students develop a modest vocabulary and basic familiarity with the Scriptures as preparation for more advanced courses. Throughout the course students will grow in their understanding of the nature and character of God, how to live in and contribute to community, the importance of covenants, communicate God's redemptive plan, use the Word in a ministry context, and discover the big picture of Bible. A disciplined learning environment helps prepare the student for a lifetime of Bible study. Through the facilitation of small groups and the creation of community the DBS emphasizes on personal discipleship and godly character. Additionally, the school focuses on a variety of Biblical topics building on the foundation established in the Discipleship Training School. This course meets the U of N Core Curriculum requirement for Bible.

Discipleship Training School (DTS) ( DSP 211 )

This school is an intensive Christian discipleship course beginning with an 11 or 12-week lecture/teaching phase followed by an 8-12 week practical field assignment. It is a prerequisite for all other courses in the University of the Nations, and also serves to orient and prepare all new Youth With A Mission (YWAM) staff. The DTS is designed to encourage students in personal character development, cultivating their relationship with God and identifying their unique gifts and callings. Cross-cultural exposure and global awareness are special emphases throughout the course, preparing the students to evangelize and disciple current and future generations, answering the call to go into all the world and teach (make disciples of) all nations. (Matthew 28:19). The curriculum is in the following six major categories: God nature and character; God intention for individuals, peoples and nations; seeing all of life from God's perspective; redemption, sin, and the Cross; Gods family - the Church; Gods world - His call and commission; the ministries of YWAM. DTS is sometimes offered with a particular focus, such as Justice DTS, Compassion DTS, Calling All Skaters DTS, Impact DTS, Beauty Arise DTS, etc. Credit will be given for this course with satisfactory completion of DSP 212.

School of Design ( CMC 225 )

This entry-level course focuses on understanding the history and working principles of design. Key topics are: elements of godly communication; advertising and design; layout, color, form and function; designing for print and screen; media strategies for a wide range of media applications. Students also gain understanding on how the design industry works, how they may best function within it, and how their design skills may also be used in a variety of contexts.

Sports Coaching Seminar ( SFT 189 )

This seminar provides training for upcoming and current sport coaches on coaching techniques, how to disciple athletes/players and setting up ongoing sports programs to develop communities.

Storality Seminar ( APL 000 )

The Storality Workshop is offered by the UofN CALL and will equip OBT educators to incorporate storality into their training programs.The workshop will be a practical and hands-on experience, where participants will actively engage in creating and internalizing stories that will become part of the OBT curriculum. They will learn not only how to tell stories but also how to plan a storality class, guide students to experience the story holistically, apply conversational techniques to facilitate collective sense-making, and evaluate the students' comprehension of the principles taught through the story. By the end of the workshop, they will be equipped with the skills and knowledge to effectively teach using the storality approach in an OBT school.

Transformational Business Seminar ( ECD 111 )

This course delves into the biblical foundation of "Business As Missions" (BAM), and trains participants in the basics of starting a business, as well as demonstrating how business can be used in bringing the Gospel to restricted nations, empowering the poor and needy, leading to transformation of communities and nations. Some of the topics covered include understanding the concepts and history of missions in general and BAM in particular, entrepreneurship, creating vision and mission statements, developing a business plan, marketing, Innovation, sales and distribution, risk-taking in faith, and discipleship and leadership in business.

Worship, Intercession, Spiritual Warfare and Evangelism School ( CHR 263 )

This school combines training in worship, intercession, spiritual warfare and evangelism in the context of a YWAM training centre where staff and students worship, pray and evangelize together. The training emphasizes the correlation between fruitful evangelism and deepening a relationship with God in worship, discovering His plan in intercession, and reinforcing His will in spiritual warfare.